The Investigatory Powers Bill, or as it has been more aptly called, the Snooper’s Charter, is now as good as passed. It just requires Royal Assent before it becomes law. Therefore before you Google something, here’s the full list of agencies that can now ask for any UK citizen’s browsing history, as outlined in Schedule 4 of the bill:

Police forces maintained under section 2 of the Police Act 1996
Metropolitan police force
City of London police force
Police Service of Scotland
Police Service of Northern Ireland
British Transport Police
Ministry of Defence Police
Royal Navy Police
Royal Military Police
Royal Air Force Police
Security Service
Secret Intelligence Service
GCHQ
Ministry of Defence
Department of Health
Home Office
Ministry of Justice
National Crime Agency
HM Revenue & Customs
Department for Transport
Department for Work and Pensions
An ambulance trust in England
Common Services Agency for the Scottish Health Service
Competition and Markets Authority
Criminal Cases Review Commission
Department for Communities in Northern Ireland
Department of the Economy in Northern Ireland
Department of Justice in Northern Ireland
Financial Conduct Authority
Fire and rescue authorities under the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004
Food Standards Agency
Food Standards Scotland
Gambling Commission
Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority
Health and Safety Executive
Independent Police Complaints Commissioner
Information Commissioner
NHS Business Services Authority
Northern Ireland Ambulance Service Health and Social Care Trust
Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service Board
Northern Ireland Health and Social Care Regional Business Services Organisation
Office of Communications
Office of the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland
Police Investigations and Review Commissioner
Scottish Ambulance Service Board
Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission
Serious Fraud Office
Welsh Ambulance Services National Health Service Trust

 

7oq6pbjIf you care about this and don’t want it to get in, you should sign the petition here:

https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/173199

Everybody will be able to view your complete internet records, comprising the taxman, DWP, and Food Standards Agency. As the Investigatory Powers Bill establishes into legislation, internet providers will be obliged to retain a complete history of each site that all of its clients has toured.

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Organisations comprising the Food Standards Agency and the Department for Work and Pensions will be capable of seeing UK residents’ complete internet browsing history inside weeks. The Investigatory Powers Bill, which was all but legislated into law this week, requires internet providers to retain a complete record of internet connection records (ICRs) for a year and to make them accessible to the Government if required.

Those ICRs in effect serve as a complete list of each website that people have visited, rather than accumulating which particular pages are toured or what’s done on them. ICRs will be made accessible to a broad variety of government organizations.

Those cover expected law enforcement organisations such as the police, the military, and the secret service, but additionally comprises organisations such as the Food Standards Agency, the Gambling Commission, councils and the Welsh Ambulance Services National Health Service Trust.

The corresponding part of the Bill further specifies the lowest office or rank that each person within those organisations must be if they want access to the records. In the police, for example, any viewer must be at least an inspector or a superintendent.

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Consequently, the DWP will be watching the sick and the disabled to see how long they go online, any longer than ten minutes and they will declare them fit for work. Or the unemployed to view if they are only utilizing job sites 24 hours a day to obtain work, anything else and they get sanctioned.

HMRC will further be watching ebay for none payment of income tax. I get how the officials might want to look at records of where people have been touring on the internet, however, what bothers me is the fact that that the prying into people’s lives has no administrative oversight.

snooping

When you give agencies the powers to authorise their individual snooping, it ends up being exploited and utilised for petty things. A council, for instance, put an entire family under scrutiny because they believed they weren’t residing in the catchment region of a school, the children as well as the grown-ups.

It should be utilised for actually finding subversives and dangerous offenders.

The nobody has the right to encroach on somebody else’s personal life, and by snooping into another person’s private life, which then makes us vulnerable. It bothers me since once they can pry into our private affairs, they have complete authority over us and we need to take that on board, and not just go along with it.

coffee

We must endure and face the powers that be, we must wake up and smell the coffee, if we fall asleep, they will ultimately put us each into a unconscious state. We must be the weapons of war, be our own destiny, and not for somebody else to make it for us.

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It appears exhausting, I know, but we need to fight against the establishment before they bleed us of all that we have. If we just give up now, then, in the end, we will have nothing, we will just continue to exist.

We should not have to haggle with the establishment, but still, we require the strength to do so. If they are not going to be compliant, then neither should we, and we should be inflexible and obtain the upper hand. We should not permit them to deceive us and fleece us of everything right that we have.

To strip us of our freedoms, and treat us less than human beings, is the image of complete and absolute servitude. Therefore, once again we must adapt but not for their advantage, but for our own. We need to open our eyes and be sharp because at the moment we are dying because we are voiceless and inarticulate and the consequences of that will be catastrophic.

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